When:
4th December 2017 @ 9:00 am – 9th December 2017 @ 4:00 pm
2017-12-04T09:00:00+00:00
2017-12-09T16:00:00+00:00
Where:
The Gallery Space - De Koffie Pot
Bridge St
Hereford HR4 9DG
UK
Cost:
Free
Contact:
Molly
01432 357753

Treasure Trees Exhibition Treasure Trees First World War Then & Now Exhibition - Left Bank Village

Treasure Trees is a New Leaf installation funded by the Heritage Lottery fund. A New Leaf First World War then and now project, based on the Women’s Land army in WW1.

Salt road artists Jaime Jackson and Maddie Mew’s work responds to World War 1 Women’s Land Army archive material from the Women’s History Archive and the Hive in Worcester.

The installation is an chance for the artists to explore different ideas through installation and is part of a wider project. Leading to the engagement of community groups with the archive to create a digital and Augmented Reality exhibition at the gallery in the Hereford Archive and records Office opening on 27th February 2017.

The artworks will explore ideas about the Women’s Land as part of the battle for Women’s rights which formed the basis for the women’s rights movement in the nineteenth century and the feminist movement. To have equal rights in all areas of life. The right to freedom from discrimination includes not only the obligation of states to treat in the same way but also the obligation to treat in a non discriminatory way people who are in different situations.

Before 1918 no women were allowed to vote in parliamentary elections. In the early 20th century there were two main groups active in the campaign for women’s suffrage, a term used to describe the right to vote.

These two groups were the ‘suffragists’ who campaigned using peaceful methods such as lobbying, and the ‘suffragettes’ who were determined to win the right to vote for women by any means. Their militant campaigning sometimes included unlawful and violent acts.

The formation of the Women’s Land Army in World War one was a landmark moment in the battle for gender equality, 23,000 women were recruited to work full-time on the land, to replace men who had left to fight.